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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
-fire, the air war between hamas and israel is continuing. so let's get right to it. we have alex marquardt in gaza city and christiane amanpour in jerusalem, and, alex, let me begin with you. give us a sense of what's been going there on in gaza. >> reporter: good morning, martha. it's been very consistent pummeling of gaza by the israeli air force and a consistent launching of rockets by these palestinian militant groups. we are hearing the bombings going off rather incessantly. just a short while ago, a palestinian group launched a rocket from just a short distance away. this goes on throughout the day, into the night. around 2:00 a.m. we were woken up by this barrage of artillery fire coming from the navy ship just offshore, the israeli ship. the big question today, whether we'll see a cease-fire brokered by egypt and turkey obviously with the pressure of the u.s. and great britain, or are we going to see that ground invasion by israel? prime minister netanyahu said today they are ready to expand their ground operation. we know egypt and turkey are working feverishly to strike some sort
two 2 1/2 hours the u.n. set to recognize palestine as a state. while israel and the united states oppose the vote the palestinians are expected to receive overwhelming support in the general assembly. in europe several countries, including france, spain, denmark, have announced they will vote to approve palestine ace nonmember state. and in a blow to u.s. and israeli opposition, germany said this morning it will abstain rather than voting no. america's closest ally the united kingdom is expected to abstain. palestinians are also receiving support from israel's former prime minister, who hold "the daily beast," quote i believe the palestinian request from the u.n. is congruent with the basic concept of the two state solution. i see no reason to oppose it. once the united nations will lay the foundations for the idea we and israel have to encourage a serious -- engage in a serious process of negotiations. hillary clinton disagrees. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n., outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because, n
launched rocket attacks. israel's army radio says missiles landed just outside jerusalem and there are no reported casualties. but it marks a worrying escalation following an israeli air strike on wednesday that killed hamas' military leader. since then an israeli military spokesman says more than 500 missiles have been fired from gaza into israel. joining us now is michael o'hanlon, who is director of research and a senior foreign policy fellow at the brookings institution and with us here in new york, former u.s. ambassador mark ginsberg, who is also a former white house adviser on the middle east. ambassador ginsberg, given the fact that these missile attacks occur almost on a routine basis across that border, why have things escalated this week? >> it is a question that no one really has a good answer to other than the attack on hamas' military leader. the fact of the matter is this escalation has resulted in a cross-border war that almost is beginning to resemble a 2008 war. why? perhaps hamas has decided on instig gation from iran that it basically needs to provoke
to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the palestinians will be upgraded at the u.n., basically it's not going to lead to anything good on the ground. what the u.s. is afraid of is that it will lead to more violence if the palestinians don't see their state actually r
, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a five-year-old siege and blockade on gaza. palestinians say that is unacceptable. that it has to be an
israel. the general assembly of the united nations is almost certain to grant the palestinians a status upgrade. this is a step that palestinians hope will eventually lead to recognition as an independent state. take a look at the crowd that's gathered there. this is yasser arafat square in ramallah. ♪ their president mahmoud abbas live. the vote is scheduled to be happening two and a half hours from now. this is something that israel and the u.s. have spent months lobbying against. i want to bring in jim clancy to put this in perspective here from cnn international. jim, first of all, what does this mean in very plain terms, for the palestinians if they get this upgraded status at the u.n., the significance? >> somebody calls them a state. they are allowed to join international organizations. they're even allowed to join the international criminal court. now, this is what worries israel and the united states because in doing so, they could file complaints with the court about the occupation, how palestinians are being treated. right now they have no such recourse. this is what could
. their relationship goes back years and years and years. in fact, i was reading one of the israeli newspapers. israel today ran no fewer than four opinion pieces just yesterday endorsing romney. what happens now, christiane, in this relationship between netanyahu and obama? >> well, what happens now is that obama is the president of the united states. netanyahu is the prime minister of israel. and they have to work together. these are two countries which stand side by side. there in no doubt in anybody's mind that the united states stands firmly for the security of israel, the intercommunity knows. it yes, there has been a cool relationship between netanyahu and obama, however netanyahu did congratulate the president this morning and said the strategic reliance between israel and the u.s. is stronger than ever. i will continue to work with president obama in order to assure the interests that are vital to the security of the citizens of israel. so, again, no doubt where the united states stands the strong security and protection of israel. the real issue of course that has divided them, one, iran. a
with satisfy the u.s. and israel that iran won't have a bomb and won't have the capability to break out to having one. so that's got to be resolved early in the new year or the u.s. warnings that unless this is resolved, all options are on the table will suddenly become very immediate, as will israel's threat to acting. that's the first thing on my list. i've got a bunch of others. i'd start -- >> let's take that one first. >> we'll stay with that one. richard haass, would you put that on the top of your list? >> for traditional foreign policy challenges, yes. what you want to do is smoke the iranians out. go out with an ambitious negotiating offer and learn one of two things. there is a possibility of an outcome we can live with, or we'll learn there's not, in which case we've got a degree of clarity and then we could face what could be an almost existential choice for us, whether we're prepared to live with an iranian nuclear weapon or something close to it or prepared to launch a military strike. >> do the iranians believe we're going to launch a military strike against them? >> give
. cnn's sarah reports from northern israel. >> reporter: every morning 80-year-old roth gets his medicine, stuffs it in his pipe and smokes it. he is using medical marijuana, also known as cannabis. how does the cannabis make you feel? >> good. >> reporter: he is a holocaust survivor and author and painter whose hands started shaking so much he couldn't work anymore. >> translator: my heads r hands are now steady. i can hold things like tea. >> reporter: the cannabis also makes him high because of the psycho active effects of the substance thc in the plant. for those who use medical marijuana the high they experience is the price for the reported help it gives to cancer patients on chemotherapy or others suffering from everything from parkinson's disease to pain. rifka thought marijuana just got people high until she was prescribed a new strain of the plant and tried it. two spoon fulls a day with her other medications. she says the pain that left her wheelchair bound began to be relieved without leaving her lethargic. outstanding. i was turned into a different person. i was resu
biased israel view. i can tell you what is going on. i love president assad. i stand with them. there has always been peace there. the women wear jeans, they'd drive, they vote. it is more of a democracy and a lot of ways and here. host: what do you think policy should be regarding syria? 5000 people killed in the uprising. caller: those rebels are not syrian. they were planted there. it is really funny. when obama put troops into israel, i think he did all of this for reelection. i am relieved mitt romney did not get elected even though i did not vote for either. i think obama might do the right thing and cut ties with israel. host: we will go to a report actually on syrian president assad. this in "usa today." he said "i am not a puppet." we have a few minutes left on the first segment of "the washington journal." we will go to pete in rhode island on the democrat line. caller: good morning. i would like to see him focus on the economy. host: specifically what part? caller: let's go with the fiscal cliff coming up. my thoughts were my belief is, and i hope somebody calls and corrects me
to supporters on capitol hill. she was joined by representative steve israel and congressman steny hoyer of maryland. >> it is going to be a good evening. our president is going to be our president. steve israel is assuring me we will pick up states in the house and yes, we think we're going to take back the house. i am so pleased to be year. -- to be here. we are fighting for the priorities our country knows are important. for the values that this country knows is critically important. for investing in education, in growing our jobs in america, in investing in protecting our environment and investing in the health care of our people. americans believe lyonesse priorities. i want to congratulate my friend steve israel for the extraordinary job he has done. i have gone through this country, i have been in almost 90 districts, 89 districts in this country. campaigning with extraordinary candidates. some incumbents khomeni challengers. they are extraordinary people who will do an excellent, outstanding job as a members of the congress. steve israel has set an objective. he has worked hard a
your pick, libya, showdown between iran and israel and syria. why would the voters say this election matters more than most? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile. you can post a comment on the blog there. or you can go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i guess they're all important. but the interest in this was particularly high. >> it was very intense. and obviously people out there want to know more. that's what we're going to try to give them. thanks very much, jack, for that. >> sure. >> there's also no doubt that this election clearly mattered for minorities, most of whom came out in droves for the president surprising those who predicted many would stay home. lisa sylvester's working this part of the story for us. lisa, you've got some new details as well. >> yeah, wolf, if you look at the exit poll data, what comes out clear as day is that president obama had the youth vote and the minority vote. and that's part one. but the second half of that is that voter turnout in the key swing states, african-americans either met the turnout rate of 2008 or in the case of ohio
those were some of the concerns he had all along, israel's relationship with the united states and the president included in that. >> right, right. it's amazing if you look at the tide of history here, in 2004 it was liberal billionaires who spent a lot of money to unseat george w. bush. they lost. in 2012 it was conservative billionaires that couldn't stand president obama, and they lost. i'm not sure what the kind of broader reason for that is, if there's any inclusion, but it shows you that if you're a candidate controlling your own money and message, that's really the best sort of practice you can imagine. >> i believe when you look at the total sum of the money put in in the races, he won about 42% in good bets, 58% in bad bets. so i mean it depends on if you have the cash whether those are good and bad odds. moving ahead, we talked about super-pac money and the fear of what it would do. the president is not happy with the supreme court ruling on the money, the unnamed donors. the next cycle, what do you foresee? >> i think super-pacs will play a huge role in presidential
type of individual who is ready to stand very, very firmly by u.s. allies, particularly israel. and someone who is very different by nature with, compared with president obama. melissa: so what do you think he would do on day one that would stop iran in its tracks? >> he has himself said that he is ready to tough inch the sanctions which are already in place. and, i also believe that it would send sufficient signals to tehran they need to capitulate their nuclear program. they have absolutely no opportunity to once more use the delaying tactics to give some kind of negotiations in order to gain time. let's not forget. right now president obama's government is engaged in secret talks with iran. all that sends the wrong signals to the regime in tehran because they believe they can gain time having this kind of negotiations. melissa: i hear you but, say mitt romney were elected and came in with an iron fist. wouldn't that cause them to accelerate the timeline that we better do this quick and because the u.s. is not messing around and they get to the bomb quicker? >> regime has use
made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his election victory. fort lauderdale, florida. independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. host: did you vote yesterday or early in florida? caller: a voted early. actually, i went out and did some last minute can the scene for the present, and i will tell you -- can this -- canvassing for the president. i always try to keep myself informed, and one of the things i realized about mitt romney is although he was a good businessman, the businesses that he had or businesses that he consolidated and got rid of jobs. so, we also had another businessman that was a president, hoover, and the country went into a depression. we have a businessman, george bush, that was the president, and our country almost went into a depression after that. people have to realize that when our elected officials are irresponsible by saying we have to be like a household, the government is not run like our household. that is totally ridiculous. it is absol
, but come without the support of israel or the united states. >> as for the rights of the jewish people in this land, i have a simple message for those gathered in the general assembly today. no decision by the u.n. can break the 4,000-year-old bond between the people of israel and the land of israel. >> the palestinians have had a permanent observer status at the u.n. since 1974, when the palestinian liberation organization oh was recognized as an observer, a position which is not defined in the u.n.'s charter. >>> and for the first time since the election, president barack obama and governor mitt romney will meet. they're going to have lunch at the white house. before that happens, romney will meet with his former running mate, congressman paul ryan. >>> former baltimore orioles doug de census is indicted on insider trading. money laundering for a stock sale in 2008. the feds claim decinces bought $160,000 of stock in a medical device company and sold it for $1.3 billion after a friend alerted him to a takeover bid. >>> let's talk -- real sports now. they say you can't lose your job t
what the middle east peace deal is going to be. that is a matter between israel and the palestinians, and the u.s. can nudge and between and all of that. but in the end, if netanyahu and the palestinians are not in the position to bring resolution to this, then at it is not really going to be something that president obama can do. certainly something he would like very much to do. netanyahu -- i mean, now that the election is over, i think we will see prime minister netanyahu have a recalculation of the relationship with obama and how it has to go forward. it has not been close in the previous four years. it has been pragmatic and grudgingly accepting a reality on both sides, but there is an opportunity for that to change. host: do you have thoughts on that, scott? guest: just a follow-up. netanyahu had a personal relationship with romney and was a very secret about who he wanted to win the election and that was not president obama, who applied quite a bit of pressure to israel in his first term to try to secure a peace deal called israel settlements in the west bank. israel felt sor
a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a wonderful friend and colleague, former senator john warner, who has been a great example of public service, military and civilian, his entire life. and to all our friends and colleagues from the diplomatic corps, and thanks of course to david and susan and everyone at "foreign policy" for joining with the state department
one nation that we should be nation-building with, and that's israel. because israel -- israel is -- that's god's chosen land. the jews are god's chosen people. host: ok, connie, let's give fred barnes a chance to comment. guest: well, i mean that was an issue between romney who was much more pro israel though publicly in particular. we'll see how that turns out. i personally don't begrudge him a vacation after the campaign, like to take one myself. but there was another part -- oh, yeah. what she said in the beginning about the republican party. is it really in deep trouble? i don't think so. obviously hispanics are a problem. younger senators and governors, they have 30 governors who are extremely important, 30 out of 50. like bob mcdonald in virginia and bobby jindal and scott walker in wisconsin and so on. republicans actually -- romney actually won i believe the middle class. if you have the middle class as people who make between $50,000 a year and $100,000 a year, romney won that group narrowly. the middle class is up for grabs but romney did well enough there but just n
in terms of mr. obama's big win last night. any reaction on the glaeobal stage? >> couple things, in israel, benjamin netanyahu congratulating barack obama on his re-election. president putin in russia saying the same thing. one thing i can tell you, the taliban, telling barack obama it's team to get out of afghanistan. so, a stern message from them. >> all right, abc's mark greenblat reporting from capitol hill, live this morning, we thank you, mark. we will extend to you or olive branch as well. >> thank you. >> good to see this kind of tone though on capitol hill. especially kidding just, how divisive it has been. it's good for america to see this. john boehner coming out today. harry reid as well. boehner said, we can't keep setting the bar that low. it is time we raise the bar. i loved what he said about we are ready to be led not as democrats or republicans, but as americans, not as a liberal or conservative, but as the president of the united states. >> that's the quote mark alluded to. you hope in light -- dual messages last night. the country overwhelmingly elected barack obama bac
. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. >> gretchen: for the first time israel is drawn in the fighting in neighboring syria. the country firing warning shots after a mortar shell landed in a israeli outpost. and new study finds that women who had the flu while expecting were twice as likely to have a child with autism. guys? >> brian: this week's congressional inquiry on the attacks in libya. and the immediate military response or was there an immediate response. >> steve: diane feinstein chairman of the senate committee on intelience spoke and said the system is great and now figure out if the system works. >> we proud over the time from 9/11 stove pipes have been down and the intelligence is better analyzed and red teamed and national security branch of the f.b.i. and national counter terrorism center and all of the above. no the question comes. how does all of that really work? this is a live incident to show something wrong in the assessment and i want to see exactly what it is. >> steve: we all do. what is the reason for the conflicting details in benghazi and one
among your constituents? the republicans and romney tried to say that the president through israel under the bus. that was the argument and romney made it at the republican convention. >> i think the reason that the president got 70% of the jewish vote, is because womens health, civil liberties, that's a natural home, and we were able to make sure the lies and distortions that they tried to sew were not working. >> john boehner today in his speech, he had a conciliatory tone, and he said the american people expect us to find common ground and we're willing to accept some additional revenue via tax reform. what's going to happen? >> i was happy to see an olive branch. president obama had the kitchen sink thrown at him, but incite of that, voters voted to move forward, and we need to recognize that balanced approach the president talked about in the campaign is what we need to work together towards. >> you sound on mptimistic. >> i am. >> an exciting lame duck session. >> still ahead, a nor'easter is pounding the same areaing pounded by superstorm sandy. [ woman ] it's 32 minutes to go tim
, as far as i can tell. it's the only thing they agree on. >> israel, not so much. >> if you were in europe, misery loves company. >> there will be nothing left, but we'll give you everything. join us. join us so we don't feel so bad about ourselves. >> did you read the op ed in the journal this morning? >> i got in at ten until. >> about givers and takers. they said this was not an election that was ultimately about givers and takers. >> it was about social issues. >> but the givers and takers thing i thought was probably the most remarkable line given that it was "the wall street journal." >> so they're backtracking off of that? >> on that piece. the republic will survive piece? >> yeah, the republic will survive piece. i have yet to start paying attention to "the wall street journal" editorial page and i'm not going to start now. >> right now, let's go to hampton pearson joining us from mitt romney's headquarters in boston. hampton, what can you tell us? >> well, becky, it is a proverbial morning after, and as we all watched the battle for the electoral college unfold last night, what wa
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)